thedevilhavingfun
HISTORY MEME  | 3/10 Moments → Trinity Test

On 16 July, 1945 at 5:29 in the morning the atomic age dawned as the first ever-atomic bomb, nicknamed “the Gadget”, was detonated in the New Mexico desert. For a few moments, it seemed as though the pre-dawn darkness had been swept away as a radiance “brighter than a thousand suns” illuminated the surroundings. The bomb was a carefully assembled implosion type device with a plutonium core, and the blast generated an explosive power close to that of 20 tons of TNT.

“We knew the world would not be the same.” said J. Robert Oppenheimer, scientific director of the Manhattan Project, the team that designed the bomb. The test was a success for him and the others who worked on the Project, though other sources claim that Oppenheimer was less eloquent at the time of the detonation, simply exclaiming “It worked!” Nonetheless, the fact that the bomb did indeed work changed the course of human history. Hundreds of other nuclear tests would follow it, as well as the two actual bombings of Japan in August of the same year.

    ↳ Image sources: 1 , 2

montereybayaquarium

montereybayaquarium:

Deep-sea squid: elusive, mysterious and parental? While some squid in the open ocean release their eggs to drift in the water column, our research partners at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute have discovered a deep-sea squid (Bathyteuthis berryi) that broods her eggs in a sheet attached to her body! It’s the second known instance of parental care in squid. Watch MBARI’s latest video for some amazing footage!

bone-lust
bone-lust:

Ray Bandar is one of those hardcore old school bone collectors that I idolize. He learned how to process dead animals he found (starting in his 20s) through trial and error… similar to my own background. Turning them into beautiful finished specimens to display in his collection. Sharing similar stories of “that time when he stunk up the kitchen” and “the bones that were cleaned wrong” and “I’m sitting on his neck, cutting away, trying to sever the skull from the torso, I turn around, and standing on the beach is three cops.” Haha! Plus passionately learning about different animal species as part of the whole process. I can respect that, I’m living that life too. I’d love to meet Ray in person and swap stories.
He has spent 60 years building up his collection of 7,000 skulls stacked floor to ceiling, including those of sea lions, cheetahs, jaguars, horses, zebras and other animals in his basement (pictured). Note that he has a scientific collection permit which legally allows him to collect and process many animal species that most of us can not. I especially envy him for that. Many of his skulls are now on view at the California Academy of Sciences, in San Francisco! Which is so absolutely fantastic as they will also be studied by scientists for decades to come. I wish I was closer so I could go myself. More - http://www.npr.org/2014/06/10/318891562/a-bone-collectors-basement-of-animal-skulls-sees-the-light More - http://www.calacademy.org/academy/exhibits/skulls/

bone-lust:

Ray Bandar is one of those hardcore old school bone collectors that I idolize. He learned how to process dead animals he found (starting in his 20s) through trial and error… similar to my own background. Turning them into beautiful finished specimens to display in his collection. Sharing similar stories of “that time when he stunk up the kitchen” and “the bones that were cleaned wrong” and “I’m sitting on his neck, cutting away, trying to sever the skull from the torso, I turn around, and standing on the beach is three cops.” Haha! Plus passionately learning about different animal species as part of the whole process. I can respect that, I’m living that life too. I’d love to meet Ray in person and swap stories.

He has spent 60 years building up his collection of 7,000 skulls stacked floor to ceiling, including those of sea lions, cheetahs, jaguars, horses, zebras and other animals in his basement (pictured). Note that he has a scientific collection permit which legally allows him to collect and process many animal species that most of us can not. I especially envy him for that. Many of his skulls are now on view at the California Academy of Sciences, in San Francisco! Which is so absolutely fantastic as they will also be studied by scientists for decades to come. I wish I was closer so I could go myself. More - http://www.npr.org/2014/06/10/318891562/a-bone-collectors-basement-of-animal-skulls-sees-the-light More - http://www.calacademy.org/academy/exhibits/skulls/